Aug 18, 2022  
College Catalog 2017-2018 
    
College Catalog 2017-2018 ARCHIVED CATALOG

Course Descriptions


 

Religious Studies

  
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    REL 331 - Islam


    A thematic survey of Islam with some attention to the historical development of the tradition. Principal themes include: the Qur’an, ritual practice, Islamic society, mysticism, the diversity of the Islamic world, Islam and modern politics. Readings from a variety of perspectives. Field trips, videos.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    REL 332 - Looking for Islam: Morocco


    Taught in an immersion setting (in Morocco) the course explores the ways in which Islam emerges within one particular social and cultural setting. It focuses both on the varieties of religious expression within a single culture, and on its forms of expression in everyday life. In the process we examine apparently non-religious institutions, such as family structures, art and architecture, urban design, political organization, etc. in order to understand the intersection of cultural practices, political and economic realities, and religious systems.

    Pre-req: REL 331  or INTD 225 
    3 credits
  
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    REL 334 - Religions of China & Japan


    Investigates religious traditions as they have developed in China and Japan. Topics include “popular” religion; classical and contemporary teachings and practices of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism (especially Zen); the challenge of Communism to religion in China; the rise new religious movements in contemporary Japan; Christianity in East Asia (especially Japan); and Buddhism in the West (with specific attention to the United States).

    3 credits
  
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    REL 340 - Global Ethics


    An examination of contemporary ethical issues from theological and secular perspectives. Topics include environmental issues, world hunger, poverty and inequality, nuclear arms.

    3 credits
  
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    REL 341 - New Religious Movements in Southern California


    An examination of how California’s cultures spawn and embrace emergent religious groups. Representative NRMs include both innovated and transnational religious groups.

    3 to 4 credits
  
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    REL 342 - Sound & Religious Experience


    Focuses on the cultural uses of sound and the physiological processes that lead to religious experience. Emphasis on the role of chant and trance in inducing religious states.

    Cross-listed with ANTH 342 
    3 credits
  
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    REL 345 - Jesus on Film


    An examination of various films about the life of Jesus, ranging from traditional portrayals to provocative ones. Emphasis on how aesthetic, political, social, and theological dispositions affect the portrayals. Selected films include foreign, epic, and musical presentations.

    3 credits
  
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    REL 347 - Sport, Play, and Ritual


    This course attempts to study the role of sport, play and leisure in the religious life of the individual and the community at large. ome of the important questions to be investigated are: What role does sports play in spiritual life? What does this mean to comtemporary religion?

    Cross-listed with KNS 388  
    4 credits
  
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    REL 348 - Ritual Studies


    An integration of theoretical and interdisciplinary perspectives on ritual as sacred performance. It examines the connection between practice and belief in a series of cross-cultural case studies and is organized thematically around such issues as sacrifice, death and dying, food, the body, and lifestage events.

    3 credits
  
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    REL 349 - Religious Fundamentalisms


    An examination of the roots and expansion of religious fundamentalisms throughout the modern world. Topics include Protestant fundamentalism in England and United States, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, and fundamentalism in Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu, and Sikh traditions, among others.

    3 credits
  
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    REL 350 - Latin American Liberation Theologies


    An introduction to the understanding of justice as the central theological concern for the oppressed peoples of Latin America. Distinctive features of the cultures and theologies in different countries are examined.

    3 credits
  
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    REL 351 - Religion and Politics in the United States


    This course examines religious communities and themes in recent U.S. history, society, and politics since 1870. Topics include civil religion, Mormonism, African American as well as Latino/a traditions, religious approaches to prosperity and poverty, the rise of religious fundamentalisms, the roles of women in public religion, and intersections between religion and politics, especially the U.S. presidency.

    3 credits
  
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    REL 352 - Pilgrimage


    A study of pilgrimage as a cross-cultural phenomenon. Attention to the history, literature, ritual, and social processes of religious journeys of several religious traditions, such as Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism.

    3 credits
  
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    REL 353 - Person, Cosmos, Community


    An examination of selected ways in which humans have conceptualized the universe and how these various conceptions influence different understandings of humankind’s place within the cosmos, prescriptions for human social order, and attitudes toward the non-human world. Readings concern narratives of creation from various religious traditions, accounts of religious rituals closely tied to myths about cosmic origins, and a range of materials dealing with ethics and understanding others, drawn especially from the lives and work of contemporary Buddhists, Christians, Jews, Hindus, Muslims, and Feminists.

    3 credits
  
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    REL 361 - Ways of Understanding Religion


    Provides students with insight into how modern scholars have explained religion. Perspectives entertained include the history of religions, psychology, philosophy, theology, sociology, and anthropology.

    Pre-req: Sophomore standing or above
    3 credits
  
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    REL 390 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    REL 395 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    REL 490 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    REL 495 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    REL 499 - Senior Intellectual Memoir and Portfolio


    1 credits

Sociology

  
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    SOC 180 - Applied Community Development Workshop


    This course teaches students to apply ethnographic and social science perspectives and methods to sociocultural problems. Students will learn: Evaluation and introductory ethnographic research, evidence-based decision-making and policy advocacy, the role of research and reporting in organizations and in sociocultural change, and research ethics and professionalism. Students will have the opportunity take part in an existing applied research program with a collaborating organization and/or to practice their skills in the Whittier College community.  The class is based on the premise that research best serves the community when it is grounded in social science, linked to community organizations, and guided by a commitment to social justice.   

    Cross-listed with ANTH 180  
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 190 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SOC 214 - Statistics


    Data analysis in the social sciences; analysis of distributions, central tendency, variability, correlation, and parametric and non-parametric statistical tests; use of computer packages including SPSS.

    Pre-req: Sophomore standing or above, and MATH 076 , or a score of 2 or higher on the Math Placement Exam
    Co-req: SOC 214L  
    Cross-listed with PSYC 214  
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 214L - Statistics - SPSS


    Co-req: SOC 214 
    Cross-listed with PSYC 214L 
    1 credits
  
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    SOC 240 - Social Problems: Comparative & Global Perspectives


    A comparative study of the social construction of social problems and their solutions in the U.S. and internationally. We will examine how particular conditions/arrangements and behaviors become recognized as problems in the contemporary U.S. and in other countries.

    3 credits
  
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    SOC 241 - Self and Society


    The course will examine how the social structures of society shape individuals and groups and in turn, how individuals and groups contribute to making, reproducing, and/or changing those social structures. The course will focus on the how of sociology - the methods of inquiry and analysis that sociologists use to arrive at explanations of social behavior. Major course concentrations include: social integration and control; gender and sexuality; inequality and stratification; race/ethnicity; collective action.

    3 credits
  
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    SOC 242 - Crime, Justice, and Rebellion


    This course will teach the sociological analysis of criminal behavior in relation to social structure and the criminalization process. The class will situate crime, whether in the form of adult offending, delinquency, or white collar crime in relation to the family, peer groups, community, and institutional structures. Inequalities and differences along the lines of race/ethnicity, class, and gender will be a major focus. In addition the course will study the different components of the criminal justice system including the emergence and interpretation of criminal laws, the contemporary roles and functions of the police, criminal courts and correctional institutions. The class will finally examine how populations counteract and resist social control efforts.

    3 credits
  
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    SOC 243 - Popular Culture


    This course is a basic introduction to the discipline of sociology. We focus on how to think sociologically, using the following related questions to guide us throughout the course: What is the relationship of the individual to society? In other words, how do societies make individuals, and how do individuals make societies? What are the social structures that comprise our society? How do these structures both change and stay the same over time? Instead of surveying the sub-disciplines within sociology, the course uses a variety of historical and contemporary popular culture forms as the means to allow students to practice sociological thinking, which is a life skill you can take with you beyond the classroom. Along the way, we make use of the ideas and research of sociologists in order to make the connection between theory, practice, and our own lives.

    3 credits
  
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    SOC 244 - Social Class and Inequality


    This course will examine a range of explanations of the persistence of different forms of inequality (primarily, but not exclusively) in the US. The course will focus on topic areas as case studies - for example education, labor markets, family policy, etc. - to illuminate the fundamental processes and relations of power that produce, reproduce and challenge the structural integrity. Within each topic area we will pay careful attention to race/ethnicity, gender, social class and sexuality as these structures mark main axes of power and social inequality. Finally, we will examine solutions to inequality.

    3 credits
  
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    SOC 245 - Green Politics


    This course examines the intersections among ecological, social/cultural, economic and political processes and practices that have produced contemporary ecological crises (climate change, deforestation, air and water pollution, urban sprawl, etc.). We will investigate the complex processes that produce environmental problems, examine how people are differently affected by these problems, and we will look at how people can act to solve these problems. The course will emphasize that environmental issues are almost always social issues: the ecological crises we face are lodged in complex relations of power; embedded in daily practices; bound up with cultural values and priorities; and are inexorably linked with what counts as a pressing issue as well as the tools selected to solve problems. Environmental problems also reflect existing social relations of power and inequality. We do not all pay the same price or pay in the same way, nor do we all have an equal hand in their promulgation.

    Cross-listed with ENST 245 
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 290 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SOC 295 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SOC 300 - The Sociological Imagination


    The primary goal of this course is to ensure that students develop a sociological imagination - that is, the ability to pose sociological questions and to find ways to investigate those questions. The course will be organized around three important sociological monographs – book length studies – which will examine race, class, and gender. We will spend the semester meticulously breaking apart these studies so that students begin to understand the process of conducting sociological research.

    Pre-req: Any two courses in Sociology.
    Cross-listed with GEN 300  
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 302 - Social Theory in Social Context


    An examination of major figures and debates in the history of sociological theory. Original works of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and more recent writers will be read in conjunction with materials on the historical settings in which they wrote.

    Pre-req: SOC 300  
    4 credits
  
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    SOC 310 - Approaches to Social Research


    Techniques for basic and applied social research. Research skills will be developed with the complementary use of informant interviews, observations, surveys, and documents in addressing theoretical issues in the social sciences and practical applications. Service Learning Course.

    Pre-req: SOC 300  
    Co-req: SOC 310L  
    4 credits
  
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    SOC 310L - Approaches to Social Research Lab


    Co-req: SOC 310  
    0 credits
  
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    SOC 346 - Social Power & Social Control


    This course explores how social theorists understand the forms and exercise of power. It will draw on Marxian, Weberian, and Foucauldian analyses of power, as well as theories of race, gender, and sexuality in order to offer both complementary and competing understandings of power.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 348 - Food and Food Systems


    This course approaches food - something Americans often take for granted - as a complex social system. We will investigate the social relationships and modes of organization that constitute the economic, political, environmental and social contexts for the development, production, distribution, promotion and consumption of food in contemporary society. Thus the course engages topics such as genetically modified food, the politics of food regulation, industrial agriculture, alternative agriculture and/or sustainable development.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    Cross-listed with ENST 348 
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 354 - Political Sociology


    This course is a study of power in the institutions of society, focusing on the state, groups that compete for control of the state, ideologies of state legitimacy, and the relationship of the state and capital. We will also look at how and why states and policies change over time. We will necessarily examine the ways in which race and ethnicity shape and are shaped by their interaction with the state.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 355 - Migration & Immigrant Communities


    Social, economic, and political analyses of migrants and immigrant communities. Will study motives and experiences of migrants, effects on migrant sending and migrant receiving countries, assimilation, transnationalism, and multiculturalism.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 357 - Sociology of Development


    Considers development issues related to economics, politics, inequality, human rights, gender, and environment and examines modernization, dependency, and world-system approaches to the theoretical understanding these issues.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    Cross-listed with ENST 357   and INTD 357  
    4 credits
  
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    SOC 360 - Latin American Social Movements


    This course surveys a select number of 20th and 21st century social movements in Latin America to examine how they emerged, whom they represented, and what impacts they had on the larger society.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 370 - Environmental Sociology


    This course focuses on sociological investigations of contemporary environmental/ ecological issues. From a sociological standpoint it is axiomatic that most of the ecological/environmental problems and crisis that we currently face are at their root social problems. This is not to minimize or erase the very real biogeochemical processes that have been disrupted, corrupted and eradicated by human actions; rather this perspective highlights those human actions and their outcomes. This course will be project-based and organized around one or more case studies to introduce students to the relevant academic literature and to emphasize data analysis and concrete problem solving.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    Cross-listed with ENST 370 
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 378 - Work and Occupations


    Examines how jobs, occupations, and industries come to be characterized by sex segregation and inequality; how work organizations become gendered and how they are sustained as such; and the consequences of these processes. Considers ways in which organizational members–employers, managers, customers, co-workers–draw on, exploit, and subvert prevailing axes of stratification.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    Cross-listed with GEN 378 
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 386 - Racial and Ethnic Relations


    An examination of central theories and concepts in the field. Specific attention will be paid to topics such as the historical emergence of minorities, ethnic solidarity, and racism. Contemporary trends in the dynamics of intergroup relations in southern California, the United State and abroad will be considered.

    Pre-req: Two 200-level SOC courses
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 390 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SOC 395 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SOC 407 - Senior Seminar A


    This course is offered in the fall for senior sociology majors only. The course supports students working on their senior projects by providing a designated time and place each week to discuss their research proposals with peers and professors in the department. This course is required and is a prerequisite for SOC 408 Senior Seminar B .

    Pre-req: SOC 300 , SOC 302 , SOC 310  and Senior standing
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 408 - Senior Seminar B


    A capstone writing intensive course exploring application of sociological knowledge and skills to the production of public scholarship.

    Pre-req: SOC 407 
    3 credits
  
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    SOC 412 - Preceptorship


    A one semester course designed to engage students in the theory and practice of teaching sociology. This course is appropriate for students intending to teach secondary school or enter a graduate program in sociology. Students participating in the preceptorship will work closely with the faculty teaching introductory courses.

    Pre-req: Instructor permission
    1 to 3 credits
  
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    SOC 490 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SOC 495 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits

Social Work

  
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    SOWK 190 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SOWK 240 - Introduction to Social Work


    Students explore the process and concepts of generalist social work practice with an emphasis on social and economic justice. We examine the history of social work and the importance of ethical practice with clients and community partners. This course is a prerequisite for upper division social work courses and is required for admission to the social work major. Service Learning Course.

    Co-req: INTD 100 
    3 credits
  
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    SOWK 241 - Introduction to Social Work


    Students explore the process and concepts of generalist social work practice with an emphasis on social and economic justice. We examine the history of social work and the importance of ethical practice with clients and community partners. This course is a prerequisite for upper division social work courses, is required for admission to the social work major, and meets the liberal education requirement for the Writing Intensive Course (COM2).

    Pre-req: INTD 100 
    3 credits
  
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    SOWK 245 - Legal Issues in Social Work


    The course explores legal and ethical issues in social work practice settings.  Students learn about laws that both enhance and deter the well-being of clients.  Students also learn to analyze the implication of laws and policies on social well-being.  The course includes activities such as visiting homeless court, training for legal advocacy for citizens residing in Skid Row, and other opportunities for legal advocacy in the Los Angeles region.

    4 credits
  
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    SOWK 270 - Death, Dying & Bereavement


    Explores historical and cultural variations in attitudes and practices surrounding death, dying and bereavement. We examine major causes of death across age and other social groups, social inequality related to death and dying, individual and social practices of grieving, and the ethics of dying in an age of technology. We study death-related issues both at the level of social organization and in terms of how they affect people at varying stages of the life course.

    Pre-req: Instructor permission
    Cross-listed with SOC 270 
    4 credits
  
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    SOWK 290 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 295 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SOWK 300 - To Denmark and Beyond: Child and Family Well-Being in Workfare and Welfare States


    Students will explore ways in which welfare and workfare states contribute to the well-being of children and families. We will also examine the gaps in service delivery and resources in both settings. Course instruction is located at Whittier College in Whittier, CA and Metropolitan University School of Social Work in Copenhagen, DK.

    Cross-listed with  
    4 credits
  
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    SOWK 310 - Approaches to Social Research


    Techniques for basic and applied social research. Research skills will be developed in the complementary use of informant interviews, observations, surveys, and documents in addressing theoretical issues in the social sciences and practical applications in fields such as social work, health care delivery, law, and business. Service Learning Course.

    Pre-req: SOWK 240  or SOWK 241 , and one SOC 241 -SOC 245  course
    Co-req: SOWK 310L  
    4 credits
  
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    SOWK 310L - Approaches to Social Research Lab


    Co-req: SOWK 310  
    0 credits
  
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    SOWK 340 - Social Work Practice I: Working with Individuals & Families


    This course is designed to provide a foundation in social work practice theory, skills and professional social work ethics. Because generalist social work practitioners need to respond to a wide variety of problem situations, students learn to apply the generalist practice model within a framework that includes social and economic justice, empowerment, strengths and eco-systems perspectives. Emphasis is given to practice with evidence-based interventions according to client needs. We attend to culture, environmental. technological and other factors in addressing needs of individuals and families. Social work ethics, values, prevention interventions that enhance client capacities, practice evaluation, and partnering with people who have diverse needs are major dimensions of the course.

    Pre-req: SOWK 240  or SOWK 241 
    3 credits
  
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    SOWK 343 - Social Work Practice II: Working with Groups


    This course examines generalist practice with various forms of groups, while acknowledging personal and group strengths, capacities and resources. Students learn to apply the generalist practice model to groups, including task groups and intervention groups, examine empirically based interventions, and evaluate the effectiveness of their own ethical practice with people who share diverse and different identities.

    Pre-req: SOWK 240  or SOWK 241 
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 363 - Social Work Practice III: Working with Communities & Organizations


    This course explores generalist social work practice with communities and organizations and introduces practical approaches to taking action. The course examines issues of influence and power in various forms of community and the role of political, economic, social, and religious organizations in limiting and/or enhancing individual and group well-being and freedom. Students are introduced to the theoretical and practical knowledge, skills, and values required for macro social work practice (community organizing, planning, policy, administration and creating change in global contexts).

    Pre-req: SOWK 240  or SOWK 241 
    3 credits
  
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    SOWK 364 - Social Welfare Policy & Services


    Students examine the history of social work, the history and current structure of social services, and the role that social policy plays in service delivery. Students learn to analyze social policies that effect local, national and global social welfare issues and research that relates to competent social service delivery. The course also focuses on strategies that advocate for policy consistent with social work values and skills and that prepare students to work within economic, political and organizational systems.

    3 credits
  
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    SOWK 373 - Human Behavior & the Social Environment


    This course examines the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments and the frameworks that guide generalist social work practice. Students analyze theories and other sources of knowledge that address the interactions between and among individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and economic systems that enhance or deter human well-being. This includes theories of biological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development throughout the human life span.

    Pre-req: Instructor permission
    Co-req: PSYC 222 
    Cross-listed with SOC 328 
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 386 - The Welfare of Children


    Students explore the diverse needs and issues related to child welfare systems of care. The course provides an overview of relevant knowledge, theories, ethics, values, skills, and social policies related to competently working with children and their families. Students partner with children in a community based setting, applying professional skills, ethics, and practice knowledge.

    Pre-req: Instructor permission
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 390 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 395 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 408 - Integrative Seminar


    Students will asses their attainment of the Social Work Program Objectives, which are derived from the CSWE Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Students will also examine and define the contributions that the liberal education curriculum, co-curricular activities and other life experiences have enhanced their development as a social work major. This analysis is presented in the format of an Integrative Portfolio, and includes a paper in the major to be presented to social work colleagues and professionals.

    Pre-req: Senior Standing and SOWK/SOC major
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 412 - Social Work Practicum & Seminar I


    The practicum and required seminar (2 - 2.5 hours per week) is designed to help students apply and integrate knowledge, values and skills necessary for beginning professional practice and evaluate their own practice and professional development. Service Learning Course.

    Pre-req: SOWK 240  or SOWK 241 
    Co-req: SOWK 412L 
    4 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 412L - Social Work Practicum & Seminar I Lab


    Co-req: SOWK 412 
    0 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 413 - Social Work Practicum & Seminar II


    Advanced level internships in community agencies (usually a continuation at the same placement agency as SOWK 412 ). Structured learning opportunities that enable students to compare and evaluate practice experiences, integrate classroom knowledge, and engage in self-assessment of their own professional development. Two full days (16 hours per week) and required seminar, 2 hours per week. Service Learning Course.

    Pre-req: SOWK 412 
    Co-req: SOWK 413L 
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 413L - Social Work Practicum & Seminar II Lab


    Co-req: SOWK 413 
    0 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 414 - Social Work Practicum & Seminar III


    Continuation of SOWK 412  and SOWK 413 . Practicum, two full days (16 hours per week) and required seminar, 2 or 2.5 hours per week. Students conduct a research based evaluation and examine the effectiveness of client interventions. Service Learning Course.

    Pre-req: SOWK 413 
    Co-req: SOWK 414L 
    4 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 414L - Social Work Practicum & Seminar III Lab


    Co-req: SOWK 414 
    0 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 490 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
  •  

    SOWK 495 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits

Spanish

  
  •  

    SPAN 100 - Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies


    Comparison of linguistic, historical and cultural backgrounds of various Latino communities in the U.S. through fiction, non-fiction, music, and other forms of popular culture.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 120 - Elementary Spanish I


    Students are introduced to the basic principles necessary to carry out written and oral communication. Emphasis will be placed on developing the ability to use the language creatively to talk about oneself and to deal with daily situations within the Hispanic cultural context. Four hours of class, one hour of lab. Presupposes no previous study of Spanish. Not open to students who have completed more than two years of high school Spanish nor to Native Speakers. Not open to students who have successfully completed a higher level Spanish language class

    4 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 121 - Elementary Spanish II


    Continuation of SPAN 120 . Basic grammar, conversation, composition and readings. Four hours of class, one hour of lab. Not open to students who have completed more than three years of high school Spanish, nor Native Speakers. Not open to students who have successfully completed a higher level Spanish language class.

    Pre-req: SPAN 120  or a score of 1 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    4 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 122 - Spanish for High Beginners


    A course designed for students who have studied Spanish before but who want a comprehensive review course. As a fast-moving, intensive course focus is on learning strategies for reading, writing, and communicating in Spanish. Not open to students who have successfully completed a higher level Spanish language class.

    Pre-req: SPAN 120  or a score of 2 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 190 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 210 - Masterpieces from the Middle Ages to the Baroque


    Representative literary works of the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque in both Spain and Latin America. Poetic and narrative texts, in their entirety, are read for their literary, cultural and historical value.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 220 - Intermediate Spanish I


    A continuation of 120,121, this class further develops the students’ ability to communicate in Spanish, both orally and in writing. Students will speak, read, and write about such topics as advice, opinions, and hypothetical situations, while at the same time gaining insights into the culture of the Hispanic world. While grammar is reviewed, this course does require a good foundation in the basic principles. Three hours of class, one hour of lab. Not open to students who have successfully completed a higher level Spanish language class.

    Pre-req: SPAN 121 or 122 or a score of 3 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 221 - Intermediate Spanish II


    Continuation of SPAN 220 . Review of grammar and extensive practice in conversation, writing and reading of selected texts as well as viewing of videos on Hispanic life and culture. Three hours of class, one hour of lab. Not open to students who have successfully completed a higher level Spanish language class.

    Pre-req: SPAN 220  or a score of 4 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 222 - Spanish for Heritage Speakers


    A course designed for Spanish speakers who demonstrate an ability to understand and produce Spanish but who lack significant previous formal instruction in the language. This course hones in on students’ existing language skills and aims to expand the knowledge base and develop reading and formal/academic writing skills.

    Pre-req: Score of 5 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 225 - Latino Literature & Cultural Production


    This course surveys the works of U.S. Latino authors and analyzes how artists across genres, such as literature, film, performance art, non-fiction, and music represent their cultures and respond creatively to the socio-historical development of their communities. While this course is taught in English, some previous knowledge of Spanish is helpful.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 230 - Spanish Conversation


    This course is conducted in Spanish and engages students in conversation in a variety of formats toward further developing oral proficiency and vocabulary. Readings, Internet surfing, TV or other viewings on topics of current interest done outside of class serve as the basis for general class discussions through practice in different types of discourse, including narration, description, critical commentary, debate, and dramatic dialogue. Some of the time will be devoted to developing conversational strategies, and much importance will be given to interaction in the classroom. Small group work, emphasis on natural language, and the use of authentic materials (including readings and films) will be among the instructional techniques used.

    Pre-req:   or   or a score of 6 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
  •  

    SPAN 270 - Latin American Voices 20th Century


    Critical study of selected contemporary Spanish-American texts in light of current modes of writing and interpretation. This course will delineate the major patterns of formal and thematic development within the history of Latin America letters as well as emphasize the analysis of structural and linguistic problems posed by the texts. this course will also explore such tendencies as realism, surrealism and “magic realism,” as well as works of social conscience, revolution and the national situation.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or higher
    Cross-listed with SPAN 310 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 283 - Cinema in Latin America


    This course examines Peninsular and Latin American cinematic production and introduces new critical approaches in film studies. For Latin America, the course usually incorporates recent films not previously distributed in the USA and focusing on global issues (drugs, sexuality, environment, youth culture, etc.). The course may organize materials from historical perspective, or focus on a selected period, theme or directors. Students taking this course will do all writing and reading assignments in English. This course is taught in English.

    Cross-listed with SPAN 483 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 283A - Cinema in Spain


    This course examines Peninsular and Latin American cinematic production and introduces new critical approaches in film studies. The course may organize materials from historical perspective, or focus on a selected period, theme or directors. Students taking this course will do all writing and reading assignments in English. This course is taught in English.

    Cross-listed with SPAN 483A 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 290 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SPAN 295 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SPAN 310 - Advanced Spanish Grammar & Composition


    This course focuses on a theoretical and practical approach to Spanish grammar (phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics). Of equal importance is the development and improvement of formal writing skills required by academic standards, specifically those at the ACTFL Advanced level (description, narration, exposition, and argumentation).

    Pre-req: SPAN 221  or   a score of 7 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    Cross-listed with SPAN 270 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 320 - Advanced Composition & Creative Writing


    This course emphasizes the development of creative writing skills, vocabulary expansion, and review of grammatical structures. Focus is on creative written expression on themes related to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students develop strategies and skills needed to write on topics through practice of different types of discourse, including narration, poetry, drama, critical commentary and theoretical essays.

    Pre-req: SPAN 310  or a score of 8 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 322 - Advanced Writing for Heritage Speakers


    Students read text on different academic topics in order to be prepared for their written assignments. The course, designed for heritage speakers of Spanish, focuses on academic writing in Spanish and prepare students for future research in their Spanish Major. It also emphasizes critical reading and thinking skills. Students get familiar with bibliographic resources which allow them to handle different types of discourses (academic paper, book review, class presentations, etc.) and ways of organizing references (footnotes, endnotes, quotations, bibliography, etc.). Extensive revision is emphasized.

    Pre-req: SPAN 221, SPAN 222, SPAN 310 ONLY WITH INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 325 - Conversation on Hispanic Culture


    A study of Hispanic culture from its origins to the present. A study of the diversity of Hispanic civilization, this course will examine Hispanic societies through significant areas of cultural expression, including literature, visual arts, music, and film. Conducted entirely in Spanish.

    Pre-req: SPAN 310  or higher or a score of 8 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 355 - Introduction to Peninsular/Latin American Literature I


    A survey of the most representative texts of writers of prose, poetry, and theater within the contexts of literary and sociohistorical interpretations. This course surveys the major authors and includes close readings of representative selections from 1100 to 1700, with attention to the development of literary genres in the context of the changing cultures of Spain and Latin America. Conducted entirely in Spanish with class discussions and extensive practice writing commentaries on texts. Designed for Spanish majors and minors. May be taken out of sequence.

    Pre-req: SPAN 310  or a score of 9 on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
 

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