Jul 04, 2022  
College Catalog 2017-2018 
    
College Catalog 2017-2018 ARCHIVED CATALOG

Course Descriptions


 

Spanish

  
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    SPAN 356 - Introduction to Latin American/Peninsular Literature II


    This course studies trends and developments in major literary works from 1700 to the present day in both the Peninsula and Latin America. Conducted entirely in Spanish with class discussions and extensive practice writing commentaries on texts. Designed for Spanish majors and minors. May be taken out of sequence.

    Pre-req: SPAN 310  or a score of 9 on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 360 - Workshop in Latin American Performance


    An experiential class in which students explore their bodies and minds in order to explore the difficulties involved in staging a text (poem, play, short story). While students practice Spanish during rehearsals, they also explore Latin America perspectives and techniques production (from acting to performance).

    Pre-req: SPAN 221 , SPAN 222 , SPAN 230  or a score of 5 or higher on the Spanish Placement Exam
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 390 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SPAN 395 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SPAN 410 - Masterpieces from the Middle Ages to the Baroque


    Representative literary works of the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque in both Spain and Latin America. Poetic and narrative texts, in their entirety, are read for their literary, cultural and historical value.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 420 - New World & Spanish Colonial Literature


    Selections from major genres of the precolonial and colonial periods (1100-1810) produced by authors in Spain and Latin America: indigenous codies, the chronicle of the Encounter and Conquest, lyric and epic poetry, colonial theater, pre-independence writing, etc. Among the themes examined are: utopian images of the New World, the Hispanic “rewriting” of indigenous cultures, and the emergence of the mestizo identity in literature and political essays.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 430 - Spanish Peninsular Theater


    This course introduces the students to the historical, sociological and dramatic developments of Spanish Peninsular Theater from the Middle Ages to most recent productions, focusing specifically on how genre and sub-genres are linked directly to social changes and political transformation in each period.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 440 - Latin American Theater


    This course traces the development of Latin American theater from the precolonial period to the New Popular Theater. It will focus on several problematic subjects, such as geographic parameters, themes and major trends in dramatic theory, and economic and political structures in the process of production. Detailed consideration is given to contact between languages, Native American, European and African traditions, as well as influences of experimental theater and popular culture.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 450 - Latin American Literature from Independence to Modernism


    This course focuses on major authors in the period, emphasizing those genres developed in the postcolonial cultural context. Literary and sociopolitical trends and cultural images and characteristics from early 19th century to early 20th century are critically examined. The course also includes the impact of Latin American writing on the literature in Spain, especially on Peninsular Modernism.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 460 - Spanish Voices: The Twentieth Century


    From the turn of the century to our present time, Spanish literature has enjoyed an artistic explosion, the likes of which has not been seen since the Golden Age. A profusion of literary movements - including the Generation of ‘98, modernism and avant-garde - reflected the creative vibrancy of the nation even as it slipped into political and social chaos. Major works of prose, poetry and theater are analyzed for their literary innovativeness and relationship to ideological trends and social reality in contemporary Spanish letters.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 470 - Latin American Voices: The Twentieth Century


    Critical study of selected contemporary Spanish-American texts in light of current modes of writing and interpretation. This course will delineate the major patterns of formal and thematic development within the history of Latin America letters as well as emphasize the analysis of structural and linguistic problems posed by the texts. This course will also explore such tendencies as realism, surrealism and “magic realism,” as well as works of social conscience, revolution and the national situation.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 480 - Major Hispanic Authors


    Intensive study of the works of the most distinguished authors in the Spanish language. Authors will vary according to instructor’s expertise.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 482 - Literary Criticism & the Essay Tradition


    Major approaches to the history of Spanish literary “ensayos” in Spain and Latin America. This course explores the imaginary of Nation and Identities, the cultural and political debates in sciences and cultures. The course also focuses on the construction of literary criticism in Spanish and translations of main trends on contemporary criticism.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 483 - Cinema in Latin America


    This course examines Peninsular and Latin American cinematic production and introduces new critical approaches in film studies. For Latin America, the course usually incorporates recent films not previously distributed in the USA and focusing on global issues (drugs, sexuality, environment, youth culture, etc.). The course may organize materials from a historical perspective, or focus on a selected period, theme or directors.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    Cross-listed with SPAN 283 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 483A - Cinema in Spain


    This course examines Peninsular and Latin American cinematic production and introduces new critical approaches in film studies. The course may organize materials from a historical perspective, or focus on a selected period, theme or directors.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    Cross-listed with SPAN 283A 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 484 - Women Voices in Hispanic World


    This course explores Peninsular, Latin American, and Latino women voices, whether writers, political activists or in popular culture. Depending on professor’s expertise, will be developed as a survey by examining literary or non-literary texts from historical periods, or organized as a seminar focusing on selected texts produced by a particular group of authors or in a specific nations or communities.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or higher
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 485 - Subaltern Voices, Diversity & Marginalization


    This course explores literature and cultural production in Spain, Latin America and Hispanic American works from diverse theoretical approaches: feminism, cultural theory, subaltern status, and gay and lesbian studies. Students will examine how texts redefine literary forms when writing confronts the process of empowerment of minorities through racial, ethnic, and textual terms.

    Pre-req: SPAN 355  or SPAN 356 
    3 credits
  
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    SPAN 490 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SPAN 495 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    SPAN 499 - Senior Presentation


    Capstone presentation required of all majors upon completion of a 400 level seminar course. Offered spring term only

    0 to 1 credits

Theatre

  
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    THEA 004 - Pilates


    Based on the work of Joseph Pilates, this course focuses on body awareness through a series of specific exercises that simultaneously strengthen and stretch the body. The Pilates Method encourages a mind and body partnership, establishing inner balance, physical economy and grace. Previous exposure to Pilates is not necessary. May be repeated up to 4 times for credit

    Cross-listed with KNS 004 
    1 credits
  
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    THEA 050 - Theatre Practicum


    Participation in two major productions, either as an actor or as a member of the stage crew. Actors must audition and are cast by the director of each production. Possible stage crew assignments include scenery construction and painting, properties preparation, stage lighting preparation, costume construction, sound recording, and serving on backstage crews during rehearsals and performances. Enrolled students should contact the instructor at the very beginning of the semester to arrange their production assignments. May be repeated up to 5 credits

    1 credits
  
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    THEA 070 - Actor’s Lab


    An actor and director workshop. Student actors rehearse and perform scenes in conjunction with THEA 315  and THEA 415  student directors. May be repeated for additional credit

    0 to 2 credits
  
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    THEA 101 - Essentials of Public Speaking


    Theory and practice of the fundamental principles of public speaking. Empowers speakers with positive preparation techniques. Focuses on speaker confidence, body language, breathing, clarity of message and connection with audience during delivery.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 110 - Introduction to Acting


    Impulse to action-introduces the student to ideas on/about performance. This introductory course focuses on fundamental stage techniques for the actor; stage geography, body positions, motivated action, timing, stage business, analysis of the script/role, and conditioning. Principles from the teachings of Spolin, Stanislavski, Laban, Bogart, Benedetti, and more will be used for both scene and monologue study.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 170 - Fundamentals of Cinema


    This course provides a survey of the history and criticism of the cinema. It provides an introduction to the aesthetic and language of film. It also understands film as an artistic expression, an economic product, and a social text. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by class screenings.

    Cross-listed with FILM 170 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 190 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    THEA 210 - Scene & Monologue Study


    Advanced scene and monologue study exploring movement, improvisation, and techniques of building character. Includes Shakespeare and contemporary play analyses, laboratory performances and physical exercises geared to connect the actor to the text.

    Pre-req: THEA 110 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 220 - Voice & Movement for the Actor


    Drawing on various developmental techniques, including Linklater, Berry, Spolin, and Feldenkrais, this course utilizes the classroom as a laboratory exploring voice and movement for the stage.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 230 - Improvisation


    Improvisation is a workshop-based performance laboratory course exploring several dimensions of theatrical self-expression through improvised exercises and situations. This course employs lecture, discussion and performance activities to raise awareness and proficiency in improvisational techniques through dramatic interaction involving imagination and creativity.

    Pre-req: THEA 110 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 240 - Introduction to Design & Technology


    An introduction to design and technology for the theatre arts. Most of the course focuses on three design specialties: scenery, lighting, and costumes for theatre, with some additional attention given to design for film and television. Concurrent enrollment required in THEA 240L , the laboratory component of this course, which will be arranged by the instructor on an individual student basis (usually 2 hours per week). Through the laboratory component, students will participate in the construction of scenery and properties for two productions during the semester.

    Co-req: THEA 240L 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 240L - Introduction to Design & Technology Lab


    Co-req: THEA 240 
    0 credits
  
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    THEA 245 - Drawing & Drafting for the Theatre


    A thorough introduction to drawing and drafting techniques for design and technical production in the theatre, including some use of computer-aided design (CAD). May include a laboratory component for major productions.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 246 - Painting for the Theatre


    An introduction to the study and practice of both scene painting for the theatre and the use of water-based painting media in creating scenic and costume design renderings and scene painter’s elevations. The course may include a laboratory component for major productions. Laboratory fee.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 250 - Documentary Film Movements & Genres


    Will take an in-depth look at specific movements and genres within documentary cinema. The subject matter will vary from semester to semester as in its narrative film equivalents, FILM 270  and FILM 275 . Movements examined can include cinema verite, performative, and digital/animated documentary films, for example. Genres can include ethnographic, historical, science & nature, and social documentaries focusing on specific topics such as health and wellness, race relations, environmental issues, gender discrimination, politics, media, etc. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by class screenings.

    Cross-listed with FILM 250 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 260 - Chicano/Latino Theatre


    Traces the contextual, thematic, and historical influences of Chicano/Latino theatre. Analysis of plays, performances, movements, and theatre troupes that express the experiences of the Chicano/Latino people.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 270 - Film Genre


    This course surveys the major films, filmmakers, themes, and issues of a major film genre. The genres will vary from semester to semester and during any given term, the genre might be the musical, gangster, western, film noir, or horror films. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by class screenings. May be repeated for credit

    Cross-listed with FILM 270 
    3 to 4 credits
  
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    THEA 272 - Play Analysis & Criticism


    This course focuses on analysis and evaluation of plays in terms of their content, structure, and style. Emphasis on dramatic theory and the critical terms that are used to analyze particular plays and on the relationship between literary analysis and theatrical performance.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 273 - Film Style


    This course looks at the films of a particular film maker. It examines the formal, thematic, and cultural significance of his or her work.

    Cross-listed with FILM 273 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 275 - Film Movements


    This course explores the major films, filmmakers, themes, and issues of a particular critical fashion or period in the history of cinema. During one term, the course may, for example, cover the Hollywood Renaissance, Italian Neo-Realism, or French New Wave. As in THEA 270 , the subject matter will vary from term to term. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by class screenings. May be repeated for credit

    Cross-listed with FILM 275 
    4 credits
  
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    THEA 285 - Documentary Cinema


    A survey of the history, aesthetics, and theory of the documentary film/video tradition. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by class screenings.

    Cross-listed with FILM 285  
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 290 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    THEA 295 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    THEA 303 - Ways of Knowing: Exploring the City of Angels


    As an expansive team-taught course with faculty, and guest artists from various disciplines including: business, education, environmental studies, history, mathematics, music, political science, psychology, and theatre, students will be immersed in understanding topics and theories from multi-disciplinary perspectives. Specifically students will compare and contrast form, function, audience, intention, and meaning through multiple disciplines and forms of artistic expression; grasping how different disciplines approach a similar experience is central to this class. At its core, this course is steeped in the theory of multiple intelligences posited by Howard Gardner in ‘Frames on Mind’. Classes are designed to be experiential in nature and will incorporate discussions, lectures, film screenings, workshops, visiting guest artists, and excursions to various museums and live performances in the Greater Los Angeles area.

    Pre-req: Junior standing or above
    6 to 8 credits
  
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    THEA 305 - Screenwriting


    An introduction to writing aspects for films, including artistic and professional aspects of the trade. Workshops, readings, and writing exercises will lead toward a full-length screenplay.

    Pre-req: ENGL 110 , ENGL 120 , ENGL 220 , or ENGL 221 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 310 - Styles of Acting & Performance


    Focuses on a specific style or genre of acting and/or performance such as commedia dell’arte, Comedy of Manners, Farce, Epic Theatre, Realism, Greek, Pinter, Mamet, Shakespeare, Chekhov, Artaud, Grotowski, and more.

    Pre-req: THEA 110 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 315 - Fundamentals of Stage Direction


    Introduces students to principles, procedures, and practice of stage directions; script selection, analysis, casting, assembly of a director’s prompt book, research and rehearsal problems and strategies.

    Pre-req: THEA 110  and THEA 240  and Junior standing or above
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 320 - Introduction to Video Production


    Scripting, videography, audio, and editing are among the procedures and principles covered in the students’ planning, producing, and evaluating video projects.

    Pre-req: Instructor permission
    Cross-listed with FILM 320 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 328 - Shakespeare


    A close examination of the selected major and minor plays through the perspectives of close reading, historicism and performance. 

    Pre-req: ENGL 110 , ENGL 120 , ENGL 220 , ENGL 221 , THEA 150 or THEA 272  
    Cross-listed with ENGL 328  
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 330 - Playwriting


    General analysis of dramatic structure and of student-written scenes culminates in completion of a one-act play.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 340 - Scenic Design


    Study and practice of scenic design techniques, including the development of visual research sources, freehand drawing and mechanical drawing exercises and scale model construction as applied to design projects for specific plays. Some attention will be given to the basic visual elements of design, to the history of stage design, to the use of computer-aided design software, and to scenic design for film and television.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 345 - Stage Lighting


    Study of stage lighting technology and stage lighting design theory and practice. Students will develop several lighting design projects. They also will assist in the preparation of the stage lighting for one or two theatre productions during the semester.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 347 - Costume Design


    Study and practice of costume design techniques, including the development of visual research sources, practicing freehand drawing and watercolor painting techniques, and drawing and painting of costume sketches for several plays. Some attention will be given to the basic visual elements of design, to choosing appropriate costume fabrics, and to costume history and period styles.

    3 credits
  
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    THEA 372A - World Theatre


    Part one of a two-semester survey, integrating a multi-cultural history of world theatre, studying performance traditions and dramatic literature. The course encompasses the foundations of theatre via oral traditions and rituals, Aristotle and Greek theatre, and the early and late Renaissance periods. Emphasis on the importance of historical and literary research is key in formulating critical analysis of period and production and incorporating these insights into research papers. Does not have to be taken in sequence

    Pre-req: THEA 272 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 372B - World Theatre


    Part two of a two-semester survey, integrating a multi-cultural history of world theatre for the past 350 years. The class traces the development of theatre from the comedy of Moliere through modern plays of Ibsen and Pirandello, to the post-modern works of contemporary avant-garde theatre. Emphasis on the importance of historical and literary research is key in understanding the production of theatre, its impact on audience, and its production of meaning throughout the centuries. Does not have to be taken in sequence

    Pre-req: THEA 272 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 378 - Musical Theatre Workshop


    A workshop exploring the unique combination of skills necessary to work in the musical theatre. Acting, singing and movement/dance techniques will be emphasized. Workshop will culminate in a studio full-scale musical theater production.

    3 or 4 credits
  
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    THEA 380 - Screenwriting Workshop


    This intensive course teaches students how to write a full-length screenplay and treats screenwriting as part of the longstanding storytelling tradition, extensively referencing contemporary screenwriting analysts. Students will formulate their individual story ideas and develop them through a complete story outline, treatment, and first draft of a full-length feature script (from 90 to 129 pages long).

    Pre-req: Instructor permission
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 390 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    THEA 392 - Performing Non-Fiction


    This course utilizes performance as a research medium, using solo performance as a means to understand and critique historical and contemporary figures. Students study the figure of their choice, conducting research and creating an original script, which culminates in a one-person performance. Additionally, the elements of performance are examined via the creation of four short solo performance pieces, focusing on light, sound, color, and language. Solo-performances that are well researched and rehearsed will be invited to present at an open performance in the Studio Theatre at the end of the semester.

    Pre-req: THEA 150 or THEA 272  and THEA 110 , THEA 210 , THEA 220 , or THEA 225 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 395 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    THEA 420 - Advanced Video Production


    Advanced video production techniques with emphasis upon scripting, pre-production planning, and logistical coordination.

    Pre-req: THEA 320 
    Cross-listed with FILM 420 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 480 - Film Theory & Criticism


    Provides students with an overview of major film theories and critical writings that have shaped discussion of film for the past 100 years. Frameworks examined will include those provided by auteur, psychoanalytic, postmodern, feminist, Marxist, and queer theories. Critical analysis through writing and class discussion will be a central feature of the course.

    Pre-req: THEA 170 
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 485 - Senior Project in Theatre


    Arranged as a directed study, this course is the capstone experience for all Theatre and Communication Arts majors. Each student will complete a major project either in directing, acting, design, technical production, stage management, or critical research. The project will entail both analytical and creative endeavor and will result in some kind of public presentation or performance. The students will also document their work on the projects justifying the choices and/or conclusions they make. This project is designed to satisfy the college “Paper in the Major” requirement.

    Pre-req: Senior Standing and THEA major
    3 credits
  
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    THEA 490 - Selected Topics


    May be repeated for credit

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    THEA 495 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits

Whittier Scholars

  
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    WSP 101 - The Individual, Identity & Community


    The foundation course for the Scholars Program. Designed to enable students to explore issues such as: human beings in a social contest; the relationship between the individual and the community; the role of education and the life of the mind; and the ways in which values and affect play a role in asking and understanding enduring questions and analyzing issues. Themes are addressed in terms of different historical periods, disciplines, cultures and identities.

    Pre-req: Instructor permission
    3 credits
  
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    WSP 201 - Designing Your Education


    Educational philosophy, values clarification and goal setting, alternatives for courses of study, and preparation of an Education Design. and preparation of an Education Design.

    Pre-req: Instructor permission
    1 credits
  
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    WSP 295 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    WSP 301 - Nature, Theory and Bases of Knowledge


    Explores various methods of gathering and understanding knowledge from a number of disciplinary perspectives. Develops awareness of what knowledge is and an understanding of the approach most appropriate for completion of the Senior Project.

    Pre-req: Acceptance into the Program and Director’s permission
    3 credits
  
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    WSP 395 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    WSP 399 - Internship


    Internship is an area directly related to the Educational Design. This is an off-campus experience under joint-college/site planning and supervision. Service Learning Course.

    Pre-req: Instructor permission; not open to seniors
    1 to 4 credits
  
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    WSP 401 - Senior Seminar in Whittier Scholars Program


    Final course in the sequence. Capstone seminar which enables student in the program to share their ideas and to peer review one another’s work as they progress through the creation of a Senior Project.

    Pre-req: WSP 399 
    3 credits
  
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    WSP 495 - Independent Study


    Credit and time arranged. May be repeated for credit.

    1 to 4 credits
  
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    WSP 499 - Senior Project in Whittier Scholars Program


    Credit and time arranged.

    Pre-req: Design Board approval and Director’s permission
    1 to 9 credits

Whittier College Healthcare Leadership Program

  
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    WCHL 200 - Principles of Written & Oral Communication


    This course aims to provide a solid foundation of communication philosophy and practice on which the remainder of the program’s courses will continue to build upon. Understanding that collaboration in both the college environment and the professional workplace will be a key element in the success of this program’s purpose, we begin our engagement in a setting where communication is the focus. This course will pay particular attention to the conventions of college-level writing and techniques of public speaking, connecting their value to both academic and professional development.

    2 credits
  
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    WCHL 250 - Healthcare and Society


    The goal of this course is to help students understand how societal factors such as poverty, race and ethnicity, gender, and other factors impact the spread of a disease and the type of healthcare to which a person has and receives. Students will gain a theoretical understanding of how these factors impact healthcare issues, and then they will explore how these factors interface with one another with regards to two diseases: AIDS and Cardiovascular Disease.

    1.5 credits
  
  •  

    WCHL 255 - Healthcare Decisions in a Multi-Cultural World


    In a complex healthcare environment, it is increasingly important that we understand how decisions have been made, and how healthcare employees can make the best decisions in the future. This course will explore the basis of healthcare decision-making, using data, statistical studies, case studies, and cultural influences to understand how different constituencies approach and respond to decision-making.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    WCHL 300 - Management of Healthcare Systems


    The focus of this course is management and its primary goal is to advance your understanding of management in complex systems.  As 21st Century healthcare managers you must learn to think through multifaceted, ambiguous and dynamic situations and to construct operational approaches that foster effective and efficient outcomes.  The course is founded upon thinking that brings a liberal arts perspective to the practice of management.  To that end, students will increase their ability to develop and grow people, learn through experience, and work with others through difficult situations. Finally, this course will equip students to be more effective communicators and to employ analytical investigations.

    3 credits
  
  •  

    WCHL 350 - Healthcare Finance and Accounting


    This course provides an overview of financial and managerial accounting in the healthcare field. This background equips healthcare managers with important concepts that will help them handle their daily operational tasks and contribute to strategic decisions. 

    1.5 credits
  
  •  

    WCHL 355 - Healthcare Risk Management & the Law


    Effective risk management in the healthcare industry requires a working knowledge of the law and the concepts of civil and administrative liability. The purpose of this class is to introduce these legal concepts to healthcare administrators and managers. With this background, healthcare managers can work proactively to avoid or minimize risks and/or can accumulate information and effectively report any incidents once they occur.

    1.5 credits
  
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    WCHL 400 - Leadership Development


    This course explores the connection between leadership and morality and how to improve your competence as an ethical leader. Management and leadership influence the lives of people within the organization and outside it. By discussing managerial theoretical frameworks and empirical case studies, the course will allow you to develop your own analytical and judgmental skills for leading organizations.

    1.5 credits
  
  •  

    WCHL 450 - Organizational Change and Research Project


    The topic of this course is organizational change as it pertains to healthcare systems. We can think of change as a threat or an opportunity. The intent of this course is to equip you to turn change as a problem into change as a prospective gain. Fundamental to effective change is your ability to bring a liberal arts perspective to organizational change. This course, intentionally placed at the end of the WCHL program, is to give you the opportunity to become a change leader and manager.

    3 credits
 

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